Unit any way person centred. ‘The medical model assumes

Unit 17 Lead person-centred practice.1.1        Explain person-centred practice Person –Centred Practice is a philosophical approachto service development and delivery.

The aim of person centred practice is toprovide support for individuals in a respectful and responsive manner acting onthe individuals preferences, values and needs. Individualised support plansshould be implemented rather than working to a one size fits all pre writtenplan. Staff delivering the support will have an understanding that clients areall individuals and as such need to have support in place that meets theirspecific needs, plans can be fluid and altered as and when necessary to supportany changes in the client’s circumstances. ‘Personalisation is about allowing individuals tobuild a system of care and support tailored to meet their own individual needsand designed with their full involvement. Historically, a one size fits all’approach to care was in practice and this meant the individual having to fitinto  and access already existing careservices, whether they were appropriate or not. Now individuals can accesstheir own budget and decide on which service they will spend their budget.

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‘Level 5 Diploma in Leadership for Health and Social Care 2nd Edition2016 1.2        Critically review approaches to person-centredpracticeHistorically support was provided followingassessment under ‘The Medical Model.’ This model views thedisability, asks what support is needed to overcome the issues raised by thedisability and how to implement them. It was very much a service-led approach and not in any wayperson centred.’The medical modelassumes that disability is an individual problem caused by impairment (Lackingpart or all of a limb, or having a defective limb, organism or mechanism of thebody’ (Oliver 1990, p.

11)). The focus is on treating the impairment with theaim of improving or restoring the function that is lost or missing. The focusis therefore on investing in health care and related resources to research,identify, diagnose, cure, manage, alter and control illness.

It does notaccount for social and environmental influences which contribute to anindividual’s level of ‘disability’.’Social care forexcellence website – what is personalisation and where did it come from.This service-ledapproach often meant clients were not able to shape the kind of support theyneed, or they may not have received the right help. More often it was a case ofthe help or support other people thought they needed being provided. At timesit fit more with the support teams requirement to provide the service than itdid with the clients need for support.  ‘The social modelof disability proposes that systematic barriers, negative attitudes andexclusion by society lead to a person being defined by society. Whilst itrecognises that some people may have a physical, sensory, intellectual ormental impairment, these do not lead to disability UNLESS society fails to takeaccount of and include people regardless of their individual differences.

Afundamental aspect of the social model concerns equality. Equal rights are saidto give empowerment and the ‘ability’ to make decisions and the opportunity tolive life to the fullest. The approach was originally conceived by disabledpeople to understand their situation and claim their civil rights.

‘Social care forexcellence website – what is personalisation and where did it come from.Personalisedapproaches like self-directed support and personal budgets enabled people toidentify their own needs and make choices about how and when they are supportedto live their lives. Clients need access to information, advocacy, ifappropriate and advice so they can make informed decisions. It is client-ledsupport and should allow the client to make decisions, choices and empower themto have a greater say in their own support.

There is no singleway to implement person centred support, and several tools are available thathelp practitioners and providers implement person centred planning:EssentialLifestyle Planning (ELP): essential lifestyle planning is a tool that lets you know how someonewants to live and shows you how they would like it to happen through anextremely detailed action plan. ELP lets you discover what is important toservice users, what support they need (from their perspective) to remainhealthy and safe. A good plan reflects the perceptions of the service user andthose who love and care for that person. Essential lifestyle plans look at: ·        Strengths of a service user·        What is important to service users·        Communication·        How practitioners can provide the support needed ·        Identifies successful method of support·        Problem solving strategiesELP is a good way of startingto get to know someone, and work out what is needed on a day-to-day basis. Itdoes not focus on ‘dreams’ unlike some of the other methods.PersonalFutures Planning, this is similar to ELP, and includes access to community resources.

Itis a way of describing life now and looking at what the person wants in thefuture. It provides more of an overview than the detail of some of the otherapproaches.MAPS: this is similar to PATH, below,in that it focuses on desirable futures or dreams, and how service users mighttry to achieve these. It covers people’s history and identifies their gifts.PATH: PATH stands for PlanningAlternate Tomorrows with Hope.

This is a fast-moving tool that can be quitegraphic and powerful. It pays most attention to the process of change, andhelps a group of people who are committed to the service user to understand theplan and how it will progress. This is not so much about gathering information,but planning action. It focuses on the ‘dream’ and works its way back fromthere, mapping actions required along the way.

Individualservice design: this aims to gain a greater understanding of service users by seeingthe past through their eyes. From this it is possible to identify how servicesneed to be designed.Circlesof support: a circle of support is a group of people who meet to help someonealong the path to their hopes and dreams: a support network. The focus person asksthe support group to help them to leap over barriers that they might comeacross. The support group also helps the person by opening new doors toopportunities and experiences.

   Here you also needto expand on what you started to touch on in your last paragraph more.  The actual methods and tools used in Personcentred work.  You should talk aboutEssential Lifestyle Planning, MAPS and PATH for example and what each of theseare in summary.  1.3       Analyse the effect of legislation andpolicy on person-centred practicePerson-centredplanning was adopted as government social policy in the United Kingdom throughthe ‘Valuing People’ White Paper in 2001.

This became “Valuing People Now’, a3-year plan, in 2009. It is widely promoted as a key method for delivering thepersonalisation objectives of the UK government’s ‘Putting People First’programme for social care. The coalitiongovernment continued this commitment through ‘Capable Communities and ActiveCitizens’ (2010), it sets out the 6 areas that are key to providingperson-centred practice. These principlesare:•           ‘Personalisation: individuals notinstitutions take control of their care.

Personal budgets, preferably as directpayments, are provided to all eligible people. Information about care andsupport is available for all local people, regardless of whether or not theyfund their own care.•           Partnership: care and supportdelivered in a partnership between individuals, communities, the voluntary andprivate sectors, the NHS and councils – including wider support services, suchas housing.•           Plurality: the variety of people’sneeds is matched by diverse service provision, with a broad market of highquality service providers.

•           Protection: there are sensiblesafeguards against the risk of abuse or neglect. Risk is no longer an excuse tolimit people’s freedom.•           Productivity: greater localaccountability will drive improvements and innovation to deliver higherproductivity and high quality care and support services.

A focus on publishinginformation about agreed quality outcomes will support transparency andaccountability.•           People: we can draw on a workforcewho can provide care and support with skill, compassion and imagination, andwho are given the freedom and support to do so. We need the whole workforce,including care workers, nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists andsocial workers, alongside carers and the people who use services, to lead thechanges set out here.’Capablecommunities and active citizens, Department of health, 2010 In 2011 health and social care organisationsset up a sector-wide agreement ‘Think Local, Act Personal’ to transform adultsocial care. The vision sets outhow the Government wishes to see services delivered for people; a new directionfor adult social care, putting personalised services and outcomes centre stage.

“The Equality Act2010 provides a legal framework which can support personalisation in adultsocial care. They are both about ensuring individuals receive services that arerespectful, effective and accessible. It is essential that care providers fromall sectors understand the implications for them. Personalisationmeans thinking about care and support services in an entirely different way.This means starting with the person as an individual with strengths,characteristics, preferences and aspirations and putting them at the centre ofthe process of identifying their needs and making choices about how and whenthey are supported to live their lives. It requires a significant transformationof adult social care so that all systems, processes, staff and services aregeared up to put people first.”https://www.scie.

org.uk/personalisation/introduction/equality-act-2010 1.4       Explain how person-centred practiceinforms the way in which consent is established with individualsJohn Obrien haspublished several books and articles regarding Person Centred Planning, hisvalues led approach put great emphasis on inclusion and empowerment.

Ratherthan other people making decisions and life choices for and on behalf of theclients he advocated that clients be fully involved and included in alldecisions. Historically a medical model was followed which looked at what is’wrong’ with the person and not what the person needs. It creates low expectationsand leads to people losing independence, choice and control in their own lives.

Person CentredPractice focuses on the client and their wishes and rights.Community Presence:The right to take part in community life and to live and spend leisure timewith other members of the community.Relationships: Theright to experience valued relationships with non-disabled people.Choice: The rightto make choices, both large and small, in one’s life. These include choicesabout where to live and with whom to live. Competence: The right to learn new skill andparticipate in meaningful activities with whatever assistance is required.Respect: The rightto be valued and not treated as a second-class citizen. The nursing andmidwifery council have created some basic principles too consent, these are: ‘In approaching thecare planning process, the assumption is that every adult must be presumed tohave mental capacity to consent or refuse treatment, unless they are:•           Unable to take in or retaininformation provided about their treatment.

•           Unable to understand the informationprovided•           Unable to weigh up the information aspart of the decision –making process.’ 1.5       Explain how person-centred practice canresult in positive changes in individuals’ lives Person Centred Practice is a well-established wayof ensuring health and care staff work in a manner that is respectful and fullyinvolves people who use services. It is a method of working that that allowssupport staff to do things with people rather than to or for them. It works onbuilding relationships between support staff and the clients they support; itis fluid and changes as the clients support needs change.

Person CentredPractice focuses on the client’s individual capacities, the quality of life asdefined by the client and plans to provide the support a client requires orwants at any given time. Person centred practice is one of the cornerstones ofindividualised support. It means the person and their support network makedecisions, seeking professional advice as needed, roles are fluid according towhat makes sense for the person.    Referencing:2010 Equality Act viewed Dec 16th 2017

scie.org.uk/personalisation/introduction/equality-act-2010>A new strategy for learning disabilities in the 21st century, viewed Nov15th 2017

gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/250877/5086.pdf>A person centred approach keeps the person with a disability at thecentre of decision making , viewed Nov 7th 2017A Practical guide to working with people with learning disabilities : ahandbook for care assistants and support workers / edited by Hilary Brown andSue Benson. – 2nd ed.

London : Hawker PublicationsA vision for adult social care: Capable communities and active citizens,viewed Dec 29th 2017 Expert Guide to Health and Social Care Joint Working, viewed Feb 11th2017

communitycare.co.uk/2011/08/17/expert-guide-to-health-and-social-care-joint-working/>Improving Partnership Working to Reduce Health Inequalities, viewed Feb11th 2017

org.uk/publications/articles/improving-partnership-working-reduce-health-inequalities> Independence, choice and risk: a guide to best practice in supporteddecision making, vewed 01 December 2016

dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_074773>John O’Brien’s Five Essential Service Accomplishments, viewed Nov 7th2017Person Centred Planning, viewed Dec 11th 2017

keystoinclusion.co.uk/person-centred-planning-2/>Practice code for Nurses and Midwifes, viewed Jan 4th 2017Putting people first, viewed Dec 27th 2017

health.org.uk/content/putting-people-first-was-published-department-health-december-2007>Shifting The Power of Balance Within the NHS, viewed 01 December 2016

pdf>T Tilmouth, J Quallington 2016 Level 5 diploma in leadership for healthand social care 2nd edt Hodder Education. LondonWhat is person centred care and why is it important, viewed Nov 11th2017 What is personalised support, viewed Dec 16th 2017 Working Partnerships, viewed 01 December 2016,