Life discovers his love for religion. He begins visiting

Life of Pi ScriptIntro (1): Life of Pi, by David HammondSlide 2: Talk through how the book was divided into three sections. Part 1 – Toronto and Pondicherry, Part 2 – The Pacific Ocean, and Part 3 – Benito Juarez Infirmary, Tomatlan, Mexico•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 3: Summary of part 1;•       We are introduced to the character of Pi Patel, and receive background knowledge of him and his family. He lives in Pondicherry, India.

•       His family runs the Pondicherry Zoo, and throughout part 1 the author gives us insight on how the zoo affected Pi Patel’s lifestyle.•       Later on in part 1 while on his family trip Pi discovers his love for religion. He begins visiting and practicing Muslim, Christian, and Hindu.

Best services for writing your paper according to Trustpilot

Premium Partner
From $18.00 per page
4,8 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,80
Delivery
4,90
Support
4,70
Price
Recommended Service
From $13.90 per page
4,6 / 5
4,70
Writers Experience
4,70
Delivery
4,60
Support
4,60
Price
From $20.00 per page
4,5 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,50
Delivery
4,40
Support
4,10
Price
* All Partners were chosen among 50+ writing services by our Customer Satisfaction Team

•       At the end of the chapter Pi finds out, he will be moving to Canada•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 4: Coming of age in part 1;·      There is very little of ‘Pi’ coming of age in part 1•       A significant portion of this section was Pi in the future and introducing him to the audience•       Only one major coming of age moment in “Toronto and Pondicherry.”•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 5: Pi and Religion•       While on vacation Pi goes and visits a church and a mosque for the very first time and immediately falls in love with all aspects of religion•       He continues to practice Hinduism, Christianity, and Islam at the same time.•       The entire time without anyone knowing•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 6: Character Development•       One day Pi and his parents meet all three religious leaders at the same time and are utterly dumbfounded•       The leaders were also extremely confused, as he had practiced their religions with commitment and discipline.•       Pi immediately receives much criticism for this but stays firm. He explains to his parents and the religious leaders his reason and proves them wrong.

•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 7: Quote and character development•       “Bapu Gandhi said, ‘All religions are true.’ I just want to love God,” I blurted out, and looked down, red in face•       Explanation of quote (Notes below)•       Pi develops, as he stays true to himself, and doesn’t stop believing, even if his parents don’t support and believe in him.•       This is important, as he shows the first signs of independence and less reliance on his parents.•       This will prove to be a significant turning point later in the story•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 8: Beginning of Part 2; Summary of Part 2•       (Most of the Book)•       While on a ship to Canada, a major storm caused the boat to sink with all the supplies, people, and zoo animals.•       Only five living things survived that we know of.•       Pi, a zebra, a hyena, an orangutan, and a Bengal tiger.

•       Pi and the tiger was the last two remaining, and this is where their journey began.•       For months on end Pi and ‘Richard Parker,’ the tiger built up a difficult, yet successful relationship and routine•       This journey was far from easy, however. Pi faced countless challenges with food, water, shelter, and safety •       (Expand/Explain)Slide 9: Pi’s development and intro to conflict•       In Part 2, the Pacific Ocean; Pi changed the most.•       He was in the sea for almost one year, without anyone but a tiger.•       Pi’s conflicts were in two general categories•       Conflict vs. the tiger•       Pi vs.

himself•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 10: Conflict vs. the tiger (Richard Parker)•       While on the lifeboat Pi knew him and the tiger needed to learn how to co-exist•       “I had to tame him. It was at this moment that I realized this necessity. It was not a question of him or me, but of him and me. We were, literally and figuratively, in the same boat. We would live – or we would die – together. (pg.

181)•       Pi went about this by “training” the tiger, and after many failed attempts it began to work. •       He continued doing this until they had a symbiotic relationship•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 11: How he developed Resilience•       Throughout the training, and domesticating of Richard Parker, Pi developed resilience and courage.•       It took immense courage to stand up to and control a wild animal such as a tiger.•       There were many times, where his planned, and he used the resilience he developed to overcome this overwhelming situation.•       He was thrown on a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger and very few supplies.

•       Pi was able to adapt to the situation until he was almost thriving•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 12: Adaptability•       Pi Patel developed the ability to adapt almost any situation throughout his journey on the Pacific Ocean•       He was thrown on a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger and very few supplies.•       “You may be astonished that in such a short period of time I could go from weeping over the muffled killing of a flying fish to gleefully bludgeoning to death a dorado. … It is simple and brutal: a person can get used to anything, even to killing (pg. 205)•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 13: Pi vs. Himself•       While on the vast, blue ocean Pi questions whether he will live, or if he has the will to live.•       (Expand/Explain)Slide 14: Quote #1 for Pi vs.

Himself•       “To be a castaway is to be a point perpetually at the centre of a circle… The sea may shift from whisper to rage, the sky might go from fresh blue to blinding with to darkest black… Your gaze is always a radius… The sun distresses you like a crowd… The moon distresses you by reminding you of your solitude… ‘You wake up wondering if there is anyone else in the vast Sea of Tranquility'” (pg. 239)•       (Explain/Explain)Slide 15: Analysis for Quote #1•       Pi is overwhelmed by the vastness, and loneliness of the ocean•       He contemplates his journey’s worth(EXPAND/EXPLAIN) (EXPAND/EXPLAIN)Slide 16: Quote #2″The physical suffering was nothing compared to the moral torture I was about to endure. I would rate the day I went blind as the day my extreme suffering began… It must have been the two-hundredth day. I was certain I wouldn’t last another one.

”            “By the next morning I had lost all fear of death, and I resolved to die.•       (Explain/Explain)Slide 17: Analysis for quote #2•       Pi has essentially given up•       He was so close to death, he was beginning to accept(EXPAND/EXPLAIN) (EXPAND/EXPLAIN)Slide 18: Part 3 – Benito Juárez Infirmary, Tomatlán, México•       Pi and the tiger (Richard Parker) wash up ashore in Tomatlán, Mexico after almost one year at sea.•       Richard Parker immediately walks into the jungle, never to be seen again.

•       Pi is found and taken to the Benito Juarez Infirmary, where he was taken care of and fed.•       Two men that investigated the sinking of his family’s cargo ship came to talk to him.•       He told him his story, but as expected they didn’t believe him. He accepts this but is upset that no one agrees with him.

•       However, he does eventually convince the men about his story.•       Flash forward to his current life•       Living in Canada with his family, and having a successful career.•       (Explain/Explain)Slide 19: HOW Pi showed his maturity from the boat•       Pi was put under extreme criticism for his truthful, yet farfetched story.•       He handled it exceptionally well, by calmly re-explaining, and changing it, until fin“ally, the two interviewers believed him.•       Pi truly embodied what he learned throughout his experience on the lifeboat, and at sea to the situation.•       As well he applied everything for the rest of his life•       THIS JOURNEY HELPED HIM MATURE, AND CHANGE IN WAYS HE COULD HAVE NEVER IMAGINED BEFORE•       (Explain/Explain)