Kindred in every component of the book. In fact,

Kindred to the philosophers of old and incipient ,Of Mice and Men is a novella that endeavors to explicate what it signifies to be human.

Fundamentally, humans are diminutively minuscule piece of a much more preponderant puzzle and in the , most people come and go without leaving any sizably voluminous, lasting impression on the world. However, somewhere deep inside all people is a longing for a place in nature, the desire to be something, anything, and not just another wasted life. The struggle to find such a place is macrocosmic, and its prosperity is dubious, and through characters such as the protagonists Lennie and George, who frequently dream of having their own farm. John Steinbeck, author of the novella Of Mice and Men, brings these subjects to the forefront of the reader’s mind. Steinbeck’s utilization of motifs, themes, and conflicts sanctions readers to understand the struggles of human esse, and in doing so Steinbeck physically contacts upon several themes; the nature and paramountcy of dreams and the conception of solitude.

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 In cognation to the “Nature of Dreams,” Of Mice and Men is a story about the nature of human dreams and aspirations and the deterrents of life that endeavor to stray them of their path. Humans give meaning to their lives, and to their futures, by dreaming dreams. If we didn’t have goals or aspirations life wouldn’t be worth living. Time would go by as an illimitable stream of days, weeks, months, years that have little meaning or consequentiality. Dreams give us a purport to do something. George and Lennie’s dream is to own a little farm and this conception is so central to the book that it shows itself in every component of the book.

In fact, verbalizing about what their future farm life is gonna be homogeneous to, anon becomes a custom between the two. This is how it went; George tells the story and Lennie, who has arduousness recollecting things due to a rigorous cognitive incapacitation, picks up at points during the story by culminating George’s sentences. For each man the farm offers something that they deeply desire. For George, the dream represents independence, security, and most importantly, being “somebody.

” For Lennie, the dream is about the things he values, it signifies companionship and an oasis where he won’t ever have to be trepidacious and can live with his best friends. To Candy, the dream of the farm gives the hope of the security for a geriatric man with no family, and an abode where he will fit in. For Crooks, the farm will be a place where he can commence fresh and have some type of self-worth and dignity.  For each man, George, Lennie, Candy, and Crooks human dignity, companionship, and security is something they all wish for, and aspire for, through the vision of the farm.However, having a dream extemporarily to reach that goal, isn’t enough. Each man must make a sacrifice or battle some internal or external influence that seeks, to avert them from getting to their goal.

At first, the obstacles are scarcely arduous but not infeasible. Simple acts of self-control such as: staying out of trouble and working at the ranch long enough to preserve mazuma to buy the land. But more preponderant obstacles anon come into fruition. Some of these obstacles are external, an example being the constant threat of Lennie doing something lamentable .

An instance is when Lennie kills Curley’s wife. Essentially what transpired here is that Lennie was petting Curley’s wife’s hair and commenced pulling too hard. She injuctively authorized him to stop but he wouldn’t so she commenced to scream. This made Lennie scared and he commenced to shake her in an endeavor to get her to quiet down. Lennie, nescient of his own vigor, snaps her neck and kills her.

George and the other ranch hands come into the barn and expeditiously deduce that Lennie was the culprit. After he finds the body of Curley’s wife, George notes that though Lennie does many deplorable things, but he never acts out of meanness, only out of an inability to understand the world or control himself.  He acts with the best intentions at heart, but simply fails to stay out of trouble. Lennie doesn’t betoken to do lamentable things – he just does. Lennie is just unable to understand how frangible other living things are and because of his exceptional vigor he culminates up hurting people. Lennie relishes soft things but he cannot measure when he’s pulling to hard or hurting someone.

His puppy is soft, so he pets it to death, the mice are soft so he pets them to death, Curley’s wife’s hair was soft and he ended up killing her. George is the only one who understands Lennie plenarily, understanding his threatening amalgamation of inculpability and dangerousness. However, some people, including Crooks, treat him as a scarcely channel where they can voice their own complaints and fantasies. A coalescence of everyone’s (besides George’s) inability to understand the hazard that goes along with Lennie’s childlike inculpability and Lennie being too babyish to understand the world and realize his own vigor results in the deplorable things that Lennie does. For George, all the baggage that comes with Lennie, such as him being a peril to himself and others, becomes the greatest threat to the dream.

Ironically, it is additionally Lennie who contributes to making the dream paramount.       Solitude:In integration to dreams and aspirations, people crave contact with others to give life designation. The conception of solitude is optically discerned throughout this novella. Readers can limpidly visually perceive this motif when the workers on the ranch go into town one night to facilitate their solitude with alcohol and women.

Likewise, Lennie goes into Crooks room to find someone with whom to verbalize with, and throughout the book Curley’s wife goes to sundry places on the ranch for the same reason. Crooks verbalizes, “A guy goes nuts if he ain’t got nobody. Don’t make no difference who the guy is, long’s he’s with you.” Even Svelte mentions, “I visually perceived the guys that circumvent on the ranches alone. That ain’t no good. They don’t have no regalement. After a long time they get mean.

” The fact that George and Lennie are best friends and look out for each other and their dream of owning a farm are endeavors to not conform to the prevalent pattern of solitude that is often visually perceived with others.An example is when George verbalizes, “Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place.

They come to a ranch an’ work up a stake and then they go inta town and blow their stake, and the first thing you ken they’re poundin’ their tail on some other ranch. They ain’t got nothing to look ahead to.” This is an illustration of the solitude of migrant workers and can be visually perceived with people as a whole additionally.  Similarly, Lennie’s obsession with petting soft things stems from his desire to feel safe and secure, to physically contact something that gives him that feeling of not being alone. For Lennie, the dream parallels that security, because on the farm he would be able to physically contact and incline to the soft rabbits that he so desperately craves to physically contact and he’ll be with George and Candy and Crooks, never alone and feeling safe. You can optically discern this when Lennie goes into Crooks’ room and Crooks’ endeavors to paint a picture where George doesn’t it peregrinate home from his night out. Lennie cannot comprehend that thought and anon gets mad because without George, his only companion, he’ll be disoriented and solitary perpetually. Another example is when Crooks verbalizes to Lennie “Maybe you can optically discern now.

You got George. You ken he’s goin’ to come back. S’pose you didn’t retain nobody. S’pose you couldn’t go into the bunkhouse and play rummy ’cause you was ebony. How’d you like that? S’pose you had to sit out here an’ read books.

Sure you could play horseshoes till it got tenebrous, but then you got to read books. Books ain’t no good. A guy needs somebody- to be near him.” He whined, “A guy goes nuts if he ain’t got nobody.

Don’t make no difference who the guy is, long’s he’s with you. I tell ya,” he cried, “I tell ya a guy gets too solitary an’ he gets sick.” Isolation seems to be the disease no one wants but everybody gets, and being away from anybody and not having anyone with you is detrimental to someone’s psyche because the desideratum for convivial interaction is crucial to human nature, the failure to consummate this need is hazardous.