Low-involvement and high-involvement buying decisions It has been thought that consumer’s behaviors are influenced by several factors. A decision is considered as low or high involvement varies by consumers, not by products. Based on customer’s experience and knowledge, some buyers may be able to make quick buying decisions, while others may need to acquire more information and evaluate them before jump into a decision. The degree of involvement presents the importance of the product, the interest in consuming it, and the amount of information needed to close a purchase.

The degree of involvement in purchasing decisions may be seen as a continuum ranging from routine decisions (consumers are fairly indifferent) to high-involved decisions that necessitate a considerable thought. Consumers with little expertise in a product may be more involved than somebody already has experienced it. People have often thought about several products they need or want but stopped at that stage. Sometimes, they come across those products and look at them, evaluate and compare them, and then never did much more than that. When some products are out of stock such as milk, sugar, they will be are refilled right after consumers recognize the need. Regular, basic products do not necessitate consumers to search for more information or assess other options. As Nike says in their slogan “just do it”.

Best services for writing your paper according to Trustpilot

Premium Partner
From $18.00 per page
4,8 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,80
Delivery
4,90
Support
4,70
Price
Recommended Service
From $13.90 per page
4,6 / 5
4,70
Writers Experience
4,70
Delivery
4,60
Support
4,60
Price
From $20.00 per page
4,5 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,50
Delivery
4,40
Support
4,10
Price
* All Partners were chosen among 50+ writing services by our Customer Satisfaction Team

People incline to be less involved in the buying decisions of products which are relatively cheap, and carry a low risk (both financial and timing) if the buyer are disappointed by buying them.                                                 Consumers automatically respond to purchase decisions if those decisions are repetitive and based on restricted information, or their past experience. For instance, if a Cappuccino is always the beverage to be ordered, a routine response behavior is generated. Consumers may be not interested in trying new beverages because the routine is to take a Cappuccino, and they simply do it.